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close this bookAbstracts on Sustainable Agriculture (GTZ; 1992; 423 pages)
close this folderAbstracts On Traditional Land-Use Systems
View the documentAcknowledgements
View the document1. Sustainability of land use systems: the potential of indigenous measures for the maintenance of soil productivity in sub-sahara african agriculture.
View the document2. Building on local knowledge - the challenge of agroforestry for pastoral areas.
View the document3. Alternatives to the traditional land-use system in alentejo, portugal, with special reference to soil tillage (alternative zum traditionellen landnutzungssystem im alentejo, portugal, unter besonderer ber_cksichtigung der bodenbearbeitung.)
View the document4. Indigenous farming systems and development of latin america: an amazonian example.
View the document5. Socio-economic and institutional considerations in improving shifting cultivation in tropical Africa.
View the document6. Traditional agriculture in southeastern Nigeria: demographic, land tenure, and other socio-economic factors.
View the document7. Appropriate land use systems for shifting cultivators.
View the document8. The sustainability of the impact of the integrated rural development programme (IRDP) Zambia/nw-province.
View the document9. Traditional knowledge about the use of soils in the Solomon Islands.
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on farming systems research and development
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on integrated systems
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on cropping system
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on agroecology
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on agrometeorology
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on agroforestry
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on homegardens
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on seed production
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on plant protection
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on water management
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on soil fertility
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on erosion and desertification control
Open this folder and view contentsAbstracts on potential crops for marginal lands
 

6. Traditional agriculture in southeastern Nigeria: demographic, land tenure, and other socio-economic factors.

Beitr. Trop.Landw. Vet. med.,28, 1, 1990, pp. 5-17

The food crisis currently experienced in Nigeria underscores the great need to understand the production system of the small farmers who produce the bulk of the food consumed. Therefore, considerable attention has been devoted to study different forms of farming systems practised across the country with a view to identifying the constraints involved and finding ways and means of alleviating these constraints, within the small farmers' socioeconomic setting.

A reconnaissance survey was first undertaken in June 1984 in the 3 target areas in order to obtain an overview of the type, organization, and functioning of the prevailing farming systems, to appraise the land resources and the physical environments under which the small farmers operate.

The study was carried out to investigate the influence of demography, land tenure, credit and other socio-economic factors on the traditional bush fallow agriculture. In spite of large land resources, there was a strong influence of existing tenurial practices on the farming system.

Land tenure exists in various forms as co-operative (communal) property, permanent private property, and land leasing, the latter utilized in contract farming. One third of the farmers were members of cooperatives, others of peer groups, but both types of farming are not very effective.

There were considerable differences in the gross income. Government support for the farmers was minimal. 93% of all farms investigated had not received any government credits and only 20% had been able to make use of plant material supplied by the government.

It is concluded from this study that:

 

- Although arable lands were generally plentiful and population densities low, achievement of higher productivity per farm family was hampered by lack of evolution of modern, improved farming techniques, by rigid and unprogressive organizational and land tenurial practices which discouraged long-term investments by external cultivators, and by absence of credit facilities to farmers and farmers' aversion to cooperation societies.
- Farmers' off-farm engagement helped to diversify and stabilize traditional revenue bases and bring about some measure of self- sufficiency in local manpower which in turn was of economic significance, especially in remote communities which did not benefit from government developmental activities.
- The strength of the traditional farmers lay in their ability to cope with large farm families (used essentially as traditional labour sources), to adapt their agricultural activities to the dictates of a rather weak and ineffective agricultural extension system, and above all, their ability to wrest an income/farm productivity level that guaranteed a stable domestic economy, with enough food resources to sustain an extended family system, leaving a reasonable surplus to sustain rapidly expanding urban populations.

1036 92 - 1/75

Traditional land-use systems

Asia, Malaysia, study, project, shifting cultivation, technology, institutions, community development, participatory approach
NEUNH-USER, P. et al.

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