Change to Ukrainian interface versionChange to English interface versionChange to Russian interface versionHome pageClear last query resultsHelp page
Search for specific termsBrowse by subject categoryBrowse alphabetical list of titlesBrowse by organizationBrowse special topic issues

close this bookABC of Women Workers' Rights and Gender Equality (ILO; 2000; 124 pages)
View the documentThe International Labour Organization
View the documentILO Publications
View the documentPreface to the earlier ABC of women workers' rights
View the documentPreface to the new ABC of women workers' rights and gender equality
Open this folder and view contentsIntroduction: Labour standards promoting women workers' rights and gender equality (Ingeborg Heide1)
Open this folder and view contentsA
Open this folder and view contentsB
Open this folder and view contentsC
Open this folder and view contentsD
Open this folder and view contentsE
Open this folder and view contentsF
Open this folder and view contentsG
Open this folder and view contentsH
close this folderI
View the documentIndigenous and tribal peoples
View the documentIndirect discrimination
View the documentInformal sector
View the documentInvalidity benefit
Open this folder and view contentsJ, K
Open this folder and view contentsL
Open this folder and view contentsM
Open this folder and view contentsN
Open this folder and view contentsO
Open this folder and view contentsP
Open this folder and view contentsR
Open this folder and view contentsS
Open this folder and view contentsT
Open this folder and view contentsU
Open this folder and view contentsV
Open this folder and view contentsW
Open this folder and view contentsX, Y, Z
View the documentOther ILO publications
View the documentBack cover
 

Indirect discrimination

Indirect discrimination is a kind of discrimination which is evident not at first glance but only after having analysed the de facto effects of policies or legal provisions. A law, regulation, policy or practice may appear to be "neutral" by not making a distinct difference between women and men, but in fact may result in unequal treatment of persons with certain characteristics. Any treatment that, in practice, leads to disadvantages for the members of just one sex constitutes "indirect discrimination" if the negative effect is not closely related to the inherent requirements of the job.

Indirect discrimination may occur when criteria used in job advertisements are not essential to job performance. Examples are job requirements or criteria for pay which are seemingly neutral (such as minimum height and weight), but in practice exclude a considerable percentage of female workers. Because of stereotypes concerning the distribution of "male" and "female" tasks, indirect discrimination affects women particularly in access to employment and vocational training, especially in technical sectors, and career advancement. These stereotypes ought to be addressed by suitable measures.

Other essential elements are:

• the modification of work organization and distribution of tasks to avoid negative effects on the treatment and advancement of women; and

• the adoption of measures (such as social services accessible to all workers) to allow a balance in sharing family and professional responsibilities between the sexes.

C. 111: Discrimination (Employment and Occupation), 1958
R. 111: Discrimination (Employment and Occupation), 1958
C. 156: Workers with Family Responsibilities, 1981
R. 165: Workers with Family Responsibilities, 1981

→ see also Affirmative (positive) action, Discrimination, Non-traditional occupations, Occupational segregation and Teachers

to previous section to next section

[Ukrainian]  [English]  [Russian]