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close this bookABC of Women Workers' Rights and Gender Equality (ILO; 2000; 124 pages)
View the documentThe International Labour Organization
View the documentILO Publications
View the documentPreface to the earlier ABC of women workers' rights
View the documentPreface to the new ABC of women workers' rights and gender equality
Open this folder and view contentsIntroduction: Labour standards promoting women workers' rights and gender equality (Ingeborg Heide1)
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View the documentNight work
View the documentNon-traditional occupations
View the documentNursing personnel
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View the documentOther ILO publications
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Non-traditional occupations

The presence of women in non-traditional occupations, particularly in the scientific and technical fields, is still limited. Worldwide, women's employment is concentrated in a relatively small number of branches of economic activity: community work, commerce and services. This restricted presence contributes to creating stereotypes of women and excludes them from professions that are better remunerated.

Each country should thus review its employment and education policies to ensure that technical subjects are included for all students at primary and secondary levels, to include women in technical teaching staff, to facilitate the access of women to polytechnic and vocational training institutions, to promote female students at university level in non-traditional subjects for women, and to promote the employment of women in the scientific and technical sector.

C. 168: Employment Promotion and Protection against Unemployment, 1988
R. 169: Employment Policy (Supplementary Provisions), 1984
C. 142: Human Resources Development, 1975
R. 150: Human Resources Development, 1975

→ see also Human resources development, Occupational segregation and Teachers

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