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close this bookAction Against Child Labour (ILO; 2000; 356 pages)
View the documentPreface
close this folder1. National policies and programmes
View the documentINTRODUCTION
close this folder1.1 STRATEGIC ACTION AGAINST CHILD LABOUR
View the documentThe problem
View the documentPrevention, removal and rehabilitation
View the documentPriority target groups
View the documentPhased and multi-sectoral strategy
Open this folder and view contents1.2 DEVELOPING POLICIES AND PROGRAMMES ON CHILD LABOUR
Open this folder and view contents1.3 SETTING PRIORITIES FOR ACTION
View the document1.4 CREATING A BROAD SOCIAL ALLIANCE
View the documentAppendix 1.1 Terms of reference for a comprehensive report on child labour
View the documentAppendix 1.2 Ideas for group work in national planning workshops on child labour
View the documentAppendix 1.3 Example of a national plan of action on child labour, Cambodia, 1997
View the documentAppendix 1.4 Pointers to project design
Open this folder and view contents2. Towards improved legislation
Open this folder and view contents3. Improving the knowledge base on child labour
Open this folder and view contents4. Alternatives to child labour
Open this folder and view contents5. Strategies to address child slavery
Open this folder and view contents6. Strategies for employers and their organizations
Open this folder and view contents7. Trade unions against child labour
Open this folder and view contents8. Awareness-raising
Open this folder and view contents9. Action by community groups and NGOs
Open this folder and view contents10. Resources on child labour
View the documentOther ILO publications
View the documentBack Cover
 

The problem

Many children in almost all societies work in one way or another, although the types of work they do and the forms and conditions of their involvement vary among societies and over time. Children's participation in certain types of light work, such as helping parents care for the home and family for short periods in the day, or teenagers working for a few hours before or after school or during holidays to earn pocket money, is considered to be part of growing up for boys and girls and a means of acquiring basic survival and practical skills. This increases their self-worth and confidence and enables them to contribute to the well-being both of themselves and their families. But this is not child labour.

Child labour includes both paid and unpaid work and activities that are mentally, physically, socially or morally dangerous and harmful to children. It is work that deprives them of opportunities for schooling or that requires them to assume the multiple burdens of schooling and work at home and in other workplaces; and work that enslaves them and separates them from their family. This is what is meant by child labour - work carried out to the detriment and endangerment of the child, in violation of international law and national legislation.

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