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close this bookAction Against Child Labour (ILO; 2000; 356 pages)
View the documentPreface
Open this folder and view contents1. National policies and programmes
close this folder2. Towards improved legislation
View the documentINTRODUCTION
View the document2.1 LEGISLATION AND THE FIGHT AGAINST CHILD LABOUR
View the document2.2 SOURCES OF LAW ON CHILD LABOUR
Open this folder and view contents2.3 INTERNATIONAL LABOUR STANDARDS AND NATIONAL LEGISLATION
View the document2.4 NEW INTERNATIONAL LABOUR STANDARDS ON THE WORST FORMS OF CHILD LABOUR
View the document2.5 OTHER INTERNATIONAL TREATIES
View the document2.6 INITIATIVES TO IMPROVE CHILD LABOUR LEGISLATION
View the document2.7 LESSONS LEARNED
View the documentChecklist 2.1 General principles
View the documentChecklist 2.2 Improving national legislation
View the documentChecklist 2.3 Legislation on bonded labour
View the documentChecklist 2.4 Involving employers' and workers' organizations, and others
View the documentAppendix 2.1 ILO Conventions on child labour and forced labour (as at 31 July 1999)
View the documentAppendix 2.2 Minimum ages in ILO Conventions
View the documentAppendix 2.3 Ratification of ILO Conventions on child labour and forced labour (as at 31 August 1999)
View the documentAppendix 2.4 Chart of ratifications of ILO Conventions on child labour and forced labour by country (as at 31 August 1999:
View the documentAppendix 2.5 Excerpts from selected ILO standards on child labour
Open this folder and view contents3. Improving the knowledge base on child labour
Open this folder and view contents4. Alternatives to child labour
Open this folder and view contents5. Strategies to address child slavery
Open this folder and view contents6. Strategies for employers and their organizations
Open this folder and view contents7. Trade unions against child labour
Open this folder and view contents8. Awareness-raising
Open this folder and view contents9. Action by community groups and NGOs
Open this folder and view contents10. Resources on child labour
View the documentOther ILO publications
View the documentBack Cover
 

Checklist 2.4 Involving employers' and workers' organizations, and others

In implementing the provisions of Convention No. 138, governments can make use of several flexibility provisions. However, advance consultation with employers' and workers' organizations is required.

Have advance consultations with employers' and workers' organizations before setting the general minimum age at 14 instead of 15 (allowed in countries whose economy and educational facilities are insufficiently developed) (Article 2).

Consult employers' and workers' organizations before deciding whether to exclude limited categories of work because there are substantial problems of application (Article 4).

Consult employers' and workers' organizations before exercising the option of limiting the scope of application initially to certain branches of economic activity or types of enterprise (allowed in countries whose economy and administrative facilities are insufficiently developed) (Article 5).

Consult employers' and workers' organizations in determining the types of hazardous work to which the higher minimum age of 18 applies and in deciding whether the exception for authorizing certain work from age 16 is to be used and how it will be applied (Article 3).

After consultation with employers' and workers' organizations, prescribe the conditions for carrying out work which is excluded from coverage of the Convention within the framework of training and education (Article 6).

Consult employers' and workers' organizations before allowing exceptions for participation in artistic performances (Article 8).

Consultations are also required under Convention No. 182:

Consult employers' and workers' organizations before determining types of work likely to harm the health, safety or morals of children, and identifying where such work exists (Article 4).

After consultation with employers' and workers' organizations, designate monitoring mechanisms (Article 5).

Design and implement programmes of action in consultation with employers' and workers' organizations, taking into consideration the views of other concerned groups as appropriate (Article 6).

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