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close this bookAction Against Child Labour (ILO; 2000; 356 pages)
View the documentPreface
Open this folder and view contents1. National policies and programmes
Open this folder and view contents2. Towards improved legislation
close this folder3. Improving the knowledge base on child labour
View the documentINTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents3.1 CHILD LABOUR STATISTICS: METHODOLOGICAL CONSIDERATIONS
Open this folder and view contents3.2 BASIC RESULTS
Open this folder and view contents3.3 RECOMMENDATIONS ON CONDUCTING SURVEYS
close this folder3.4 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INTERVIEWING CHILDREN
View the documentCreating the right setting
View the document3.5 FURTHER RESEARCH
View the documentAppendix 3.1 List of detailed variables in child labour surveys
View the documentBibliography on child labour surveys, statistics and related matters
Open this folder and view contents4. Alternatives to child labour
Open this folder and view contents5. Strategies to address child slavery
Open this folder and view contents6. Strategies for employers and their organizations
Open this folder and view contents7. Trade unions against child labour
Open this folder and view contents8. Awareness-raising
Open this folder and view contents9. Action by community groups and NGOs
Open this folder and view contents10. Resources on child labour
View the documentOther ILO publications
View the documentBack Cover
 

3.4 RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INTERVIEWING CHILDREN

Children are key informants on questions about "terms and conditions" and the "effect(s)" of their working situation on them. They may not be able to judge whether their well-being is damaged or will be damaged, but they can - if willing - give a description of their experiences and feelings.

The obvious way of collecting this information is by interview. A standard context for research interviews is the household-based surveys. But for reasons already explained, it is impossible to conduct in-depth interviews with child workers inside an employer's workplace (or premises). The atmosphere is wrong, the time-frame is wrong, the employer may be obstructive; the child is most unlikely to be forthcoming and - fearing repercussions from the employer - may even give answers which please the employer, especially if the employer is present at the interview. This may also be true even at the household level, which makes it important to interview the child alone, particularly away from his/her parents or so-called "guardians". However, contacting the child when and where he/she is completely alone may not be so easy.

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