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close this bookAction Against Child Labour (ILO; 2000; 356 pages)
View the documentPreface
Open this folder and view contents1. National policies and programmes
Open this folder and view contents2. Towards improved legislation
Open this folder and view contents3. Improving the knowledge base on child labour
close this folder4. Alternatives to child labour
View the documentINTRODUCTION
close this folder4.1 STRATEGIES IN EDUCATION
View the documentEducating children about their rights and about child labour issues
View the documentInvestment in early childhood development programmes
View the documentIncreasing access to education
View the documentImproving the quality of formal and non-formal education
View the documentNon-formal education as an entry, a re-entry or alternative for (former) working children
View the documentApproaches to vocational education
Open this folder and view contents4.2 PREVENTION AND REHABILITATION PROGRAMMES FOR CHILDREN FROM ESPECIALLY VULNERABLE GROUPS
View the document4.3 EDUCATION PROGRAMMES AND INCOME OPPORTUNITIES FOR PARENTS
View the document4.4 WORKPLACE AND COMMUNITY MONITORING
Open this folder and view contents4.5 LESSONS FROM EXPERIENCE: PLANNING ACTION PROGRAMMES
View the documentChecklist 4.1 Identifying target groups and selecting children
View the documentChecklist 4.2 Planning vocational skills training programmes
View the documentChecklist 4.3 Measuring the impact of action programmes
Open this folder and view contents5. Strategies to address child slavery
Open this folder and view contents6. Strategies for employers and their organizations
Open this folder and view contents7. Trade unions against child labour
Open this folder and view contents8. Awareness-raising
Open this folder and view contents9. Action by community groups and NGOs
Open this folder and view contents10. Resources on child labour
View the documentOther ILO publications
View the documentBack Cover
 

Educating children about their rights and about child labour issues

Children need to know their rights and the dangers and risks of work to their health, safety, and education. They need to learn to protect themselves and to have information about their rights: which laws exist specifically for their protection, and to whom they can turn for help when they are at risk of being exploited. Education on children's rights can and should be integrated into the curriculum through social studies, health education, literacy and language learning. In this way, children are also in a better position to protect themselves, express themselves, negotiate and assert their rights. Education on rights teaches them about their responsibilities to themselves and to others; it helps them become productive citizens of their own communities while receiving adequate care and protection.

Box 4.1. Awareness-raising about child labour for teachers and children - a joint effort of the Provincial Labour Welfare and Protection Office and the Provincial Primary Education Office of Srisaket Province, Thailand

There is a high incidence of migration among children from Srisaket province to the cities in search of jobs. During 1993-94, the project mobilized teachers and school administrators in preventing child labour. A total of 22 schools with high drop-out rates participated in the campaign among teachers and children to keep them from entering work, and encourage them to stay at school and continue with secondary education.

In Phase I of the project, teachers were trained on child labour. Teaching materials were developed for use by teachers (a handbook) and by children in the classroom. In Phase II, teachers used the suggested methods in the handbook and classroom materials (magazines, newspaper clippings, pamphlets, videos and animation about child labour) to inform and teach children about the effects of child labour on their health and safety, and about existing laws applicable to them. Child labour corners or exhibits were set up in school libraries or other parts of the school. Children engaged in group discussions and were involved in various activities such as art, writing and quizzes on child labour issues.

Teachers also recognized the need to work with parents who decide on whether children go to school or to work. They tried to convince them that in the long term it would be more beneficial to continue their children's education and to postpone their employment. Teachers who participated in the campaign met regularly to follow up on the project's progress and development. The project involved additional work for the teachers who were the main resources in the project, fully committed and creative in developing and implementing strategies for the prevention of child labour.

The outcome was that most of the children in the 22 schools completed their basic education up to the secondary level. As a result, the That Ministry of Education has developed a child labour curriculum which is to be integrated into the primary school curriculum, particularly in provinces where there is a high incidence of child labour and school drop-out.

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