Change to Ukrainian interface versionChange to English interface versionChange to Russian interface versionHome pageClear last query resultsHelp page
Search for specific termsBrowse by subject categoryBrowse alphabetical list of titlesBrowse by organizationBrowse special topic issues

close this bookAction Against Child Labour (ILO; 2000; 356 pages)
View the documentPreface
Open this folder and view contents1. National policies and programmes
Open this folder and view contents2. Towards improved legislation
Open this folder and view contents3. Improving the knowledge base on child labour
close this folder4. Alternatives to child labour
View the documentINTRODUCTION
close this folder4.1 STRATEGIES IN EDUCATION
View the documentEducating children about their rights and about child labour issues
View the documentInvestment in early childhood development programmes
View the documentIncreasing access to education
View the documentImproving the quality of formal and non-formal education
View the documentNon-formal education as an entry, a re-entry or alternative for (former) working children
View the documentApproaches to vocational education
Open this folder and view contents4.2 PREVENTION AND REHABILITATION PROGRAMMES FOR CHILDREN FROM ESPECIALLY VULNERABLE GROUPS
View the document4.3 EDUCATION PROGRAMMES AND INCOME OPPORTUNITIES FOR PARENTS
View the document4.4 WORKPLACE AND COMMUNITY MONITORING
Open this folder and view contents4.5 LESSONS FROM EXPERIENCE: PLANNING ACTION PROGRAMMES
View the documentChecklist 4.1 Identifying target groups and selecting children
View the documentChecklist 4.2 Planning vocational skills training programmes
View the documentChecklist 4.3 Measuring the impact of action programmes
Open this folder and view contents5. Strategies to address child slavery
Open this folder and view contents6. Strategies for employers and their organizations
Open this folder and view contents7. Trade unions against child labour
Open this folder and view contents8. Awareness-raising
Open this folder and view contents9. Action by community groups and NGOs
Open this folder and view contents10. Resources on child labour
View the documentOther ILO publications
View the documentBack Cover
 

Investment in early childhood development programmes

Integrated early childhood development programmes that address the physical, social, emotional and cognitive development of young children have in recent years received more attention and visibility because of their evident impact. Children who participate in various forms of these programmes are healthier, socially well adjusted and better prepared for learning experiences in later childhood.

Thus, the programmes help prevent school failure, which contributes to children dropping out and being recruited for full-time hazardous work. The more successful children are at school, the more persistent parents tend to be about keeping them there. At the same time, most early childhood development programmes involve a parent education component and are good entry points for educating both parents and children about the detrimental effects of full-time and dangerous work of children.

Box 4.2. Strengthening pre-school education - The Ministry of Education in the United Republic of Tanzania

Many children among farmers and shepherd families in the United Republic of Tanzania start to work during their: early childhood years and this is an obstacle to their entry into and completion of primary school. Therefore, the Ministry of Education launched a programme to bring children from poor families into school at an earlier stage and pre-empt their participation in child labour before they enter primary school. The goal was to motivate children to stay at school by preparing them for school and creating an interest for learning through early childhood education.

The project was conducted in five regions where the drop-out rates were high and children's participation in cattle-herding and domestic work clearly affected their school participation. A series of baseline surveys on school enrolment and child labour were conducted. Awareness-raising took place among school committees and ward coordinators about the need to set up early childhood centres and to educate them about child labour issues. Fifty pre-school teachers were trained and a manual for child labour was developed for use by primary school teachers and school committees.

The project succeeded in generating enthusiasm for school among children, parents and teachers. It is now government policy to provide for early childhood education. The Ministry of Education has also prepared a manual on child labour, labour laws and children's rights to be used in the primary school civics curriculum throughout the country.

to previous section to next section

[Ukrainian]  [English]  [Russian]