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close this bookAction Against Child Labour (ILO; 2000; 356 pages)
View the documentPreface
Open this folder and view contents1. National policies and programmes
Open this folder and view contents2. Towards improved legislation
Open this folder and view contents3. Improving the knowledge base on child labour
close this folder4. Alternatives to child labour
View the documentINTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents4.1 STRATEGIES IN EDUCATION
Open this folder and view contents4.2 PREVENTION AND REHABILITATION PROGRAMMES FOR CHILDREN FROM ESPECIALLY VULNERABLE GROUPS
View the document4.3 EDUCATION PROGRAMMES AND INCOME OPPORTUNITIES FOR PARENTS
View the document4.4 WORKPLACE AND COMMUNITY MONITORING
Open this folder and view contents4.5 LESSONS FROM EXPERIENCE: PLANNING ACTION PROGRAMMES
View the documentChecklist 4.1 Identifying target groups and selecting children
View the documentChecklist 4.2 Planning vocational skills training programmes
View the documentChecklist 4.3 Measuring the impact of action programmes
Open this folder and view contents5. Strategies to address child slavery
Open this folder and view contents6. Strategies for employers and their organizations
Open this folder and view contents7. Trade unions against child labour
Open this folder and view contents8. Awareness-raising
Open this folder and view contents9. Action by community groups and NGOs
Open this folder and view contents10. Resources on child labour
View the documentOther ILO publications
View the documentBack Cover
 

4.4 WORKPLACE AND COMMUNITY MONITORING

Systematic efforts to ensure that workplaces and communities remain child labour free mean first of all that awareness-raising activities should not be limited to the children and parents, but extended to all groups involved: employers, managers, and adult workers in workplaces, community leaders, service providers and enforcement agencies (see also Chapter 9). In a second stage, monitoring mechanisms need to be set up to ensure that the children withdrawn from work remain and complete school, and that new children do not enter work. This can be done in the schools or educational centres, in the workplaces and in the children's communities.

In any workplace monitoring programme, the active participation of the concerned employers, manufacturers, contractors and subcontractors is critical, as the commitment to free all manufacturing and production processes from child labour may call for a change in established and traditional manufacturing and production practices. The involvement of the concerned workers' representatives, and local community groups, as well as the concerned governmental agencies, is also critical (see also Chapters 6 and 7).

The involvement of children in the production and manufacture of goods for export has become a matter for international concern. Faced with outside pressure, some producers and manufacturers have turned to the ILO for advice on action to eliminate child labour from their particular industry. This has resulted in three instances in concrete prevention and monitoring programmes in the garment industry in Bangladesh, the football industry in Pakistan and its international counterparts, and the carpet industry, also in Pakistan. The result has been partnerships that span geographical and cultural boundaries, as well as positive changes in the attitudes and practices of the communities, in that the families have been willing to withdraw their children from work and send them to school.

The basic elements of the ILO-IPEC prevention and monitoring programmes are:

• ensuring cooperation and collaboration of employers/manufacturers, workers' organizations, district administration and other government departments;

• assessing child labour involvement in the particular sector or industry;

• assisting the participating employers/manufacturers in setting up their internal monitoring system;

• operating an external monitoring team involving ILO project staff;

• identifying and zoning monitoring area for visits;

• establishing a monitoring database to collect, analyse and synthesize data, to indicate schedules of surprise, monitoring visits, and to prepare reports on progress; and

• establishing linkages with the social protection component of the programme.

Social protection programmes provide viable and practical alternatives to the children and their families affected by the prevention and monitoring programme. These programmes support the withdrawal of the children from workplaces and prevent them from working by sensitizing and mobilizing the communities. They also provide services to rehabilitate the children withdrawn so that they can be integrated into mainstream educational systems and other developmental activities. The basic elements of a social protection programme are:

awareness-raising, mobilisation and counselling: mobilizing families through one-to-one contact and group meetings to prevent child labour and to encourage them so that their children participate in the activities of the village education and action clusters set up under the project; communicating with the families on an ongoing basis;

group training of adults to form the family clubs/committees for mothers and fathers to encourage them to play an active role in the programme;

non-formal education to provide literacy, basic education and practical skills training to the children withdrawn and their younger siblings;

recreational activities to foster social and physical development;

health services through linkages with local health facilities;

mainstreaming of younger children into formal schools;

training in income-generation activities (adults): to follow up training in the credit/ savings facility and training in various income-generation activities for the adults in the family;

provision of a credit/savings facility to the adults in the family; and

mainstreaming of children of employable age and adults into the labour market.

There is potential in local community watch systems to sustain action against child labour and to ensure that workplaces remain free from child labour. The establishment of local child welfare and vigilance committees is an effective tool which is increasingly being utilized in many countries. These committees can monitor, undertake action and even provide limited resources and services where necessary. Experience shows that programmes which stress a participatory approach and actively involve the children, their parents, community leaders and teachers are the most successful. Decentralization of authority to local governments and community structures also has a positive impact and results in effective community participation.

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