Change to Ukrainian interface versionChange to English interface versionChange to Russian interface versionHome pageClear last query resultsHelp page
Search for specific termsBrowse by subject categoryBrowse alphabetical list of titlesBrowse by organizationBrowse special topic issues

close this bookAction Against Child Labour (ILO; 2000; 356 pages)
View the documentPreface
Open this folder and view contents1. National policies and programmes
Open this folder and view contents2. Towards improved legislation
Open this folder and view contents3. Improving the knowledge base on child labour
close this folder4. Alternatives to child labour
View the documentINTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contents4.1 STRATEGIES IN EDUCATION
Open this folder and view contents4.2 PREVENTION AND REHABILITATION PROGRAMMES FOR CHILDREN FROM ESPECIALLY VULNERABLE GROUPS
View the document4.3 EDUCATION PROGRAMMES AND INCOME OPPORTUNITIES FOR PARENTS
View the document4.4 WORKPLACE AND COMMUNITY MONITORING
close this folder4.5 LESSONS FROM EXPERIENCE: PLANNING ACTION PROGRAMMES
View the documentIdentifying priority target groups
View the documentConcerted action
View the documentSetting programme objectives
View the documentChecklist 4.1 Identifying target groups and selecting children
View the documentChecklist 4.2 Planning vocational skills training programmes
View the documentChecklist 4.3 Measuring the impact of action programmes
Open this folder and view contents5. Strategies to address child slavery
Open this folder and view contents6. Strategies for employers and their organizations
Open this folder and view contents7. Trade unions against child labour
Open this folder and view contents8. Awareness-raising
Open this folder and view contents9. Action by community groups and NGOs
Open this folder and view contents10. Resources on child labour
View the documentOther ILO publications
View the documentBack Cover
 

Identifying priority target groups

There is a specific context for every direct action programme, and programme directions will depend upon the needs of specific groups of child workers in each country and the possibilities for practical measures.

As the child labour problem is so widespread, priorities have to be set based on the nature of the work and the risks involved for children. Given the socio-economic situation of some countries and the lack of adequate resources and infrastructure, the complete elimination of child labour will be a lengthy process. But there can be no excuse for ignoring flagrant cases of child abuse that are an outright breach of human rights and an affront to the dignity of children. Clearly the children who fall into this category are those engaged in activities that pose a serious danger to their health, or physical or moral integrity; those who work in slave-like conditions or are subjected to forced labour; and those caught up in illicit networks such as prostitution, drug trafficking and pornography (see Chapter 2, section 2.4). Some children are particularly vulnerable to this type of exploitation because of their age and sex, because they live and work on their own, or because they belong to socially excluded groups.

Appropriate measures need to be adopted urgently to rescue children from these worst forms of child labour. Prevention is crucial; but children must also be withdrawn from such activities and both they and their families provided with alternatives. Sometimes, especially if a country is only starting to address child labour problems, there is resistance to begin to combat some of the worst forms, because of political and social sensitivity. The existence of these types of child labour is even denied and very few partners come forward who can effectively address the problems. Nonetheless, at a minimum, the worst forms of child labour need to be tackled immediately.

to previous section to next section

[Ukrainian]  [English]  [Russian]