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close this bookAppropriate Community Technology - A Training Manual (Peace Corps; 1982; 685 pages)
View the documentThe Farallones Institute Rural Center
View the documentCHP International, INC.
View the documentPreface
View the documentAcknowledgments
View the documentIntroduction
Open this folder and view contentsPhase I: Introduction to training
Open this folder and view contentsPhase II: Earthen construction and fuel-saving cookstoves
close this folderPhase III: Pedal/treadle power
View the documentPhase III Calendar
View the documentSession 1. Maternal and child health: part 1
View the documentSession 2. The path of the sun
View the documentSession 3. Introduction to pedal/treadle power
View the documentSession 4. Design considerations for pedal/treadle power
View the documentSession 5. Classical mechanics: principles of pedal/treadle power
View the documentSession 6. Use of appropriate aids to communication
View the documentSession 7. Maternal and child health: part 2
View the documentSession 8. Part one: familiarization with materials and tools
View the documentSession 8. Part two: familiarization with the bicycle
View the documentSession 9. Introduction to design considerations
View the documentSession 10. Presentation of designs
View the documentSession 11. Construction of pedal/treadle-powered devices
View the documentSession 12. Blacksmithing and metalwork
View the documentSession 13. Appropriate technologies for health
View the documentSession 14. Case studies in community health
View the documentSession 15. Preparation for pedal/treadle presentations* *
View the documentSession 16. Heat transfer
View the documentSession 17. The role of the volunteer in development: international development part 1: the green revolution: successes and failures
View the documentSession 18. Presentation of pedal/treadle-power devices
View the documentSession 19. Volunteers in development part one. women in development
View the documentSession 20. Mid-program evaluation part one : program evaluation
Open this folder and view contentsPhase IV: Solar water heaters
Open this folder and view contentsPhase V: Solar agricultural dryers
Open this folder and view contentsPhase VI: Concluding the program: The energy fair
Open this folder and view contentsAppendices
 

Session 20. Mid-program evaluation part one : program evaluation

Total time:

Approximately 4 hours The total time may vary according to the number of participants and options exercised.

Objective:

To evaluate the effectiveness of the program to date in meeting goals and expectations.

Resources:

* Attachment III-20/1-A, "Mid-Cycle and Final Evaluation of Training Goals
* Attachment III-20/1-B, "Discussion Questions''
* "Expectation Lists," prepared in Phase I: Session 2

Materials:

Newsprint and felt-tip pens

Procedures:

Step 1. (10 minutes)
Present an overview of the entire session (Parts One and Two) and have participants select one of the indicated options (see Step 6).

Step 2. (20 minutes)
Distribute Attachment III-20/1-A, "Mid-Cycle and Final Evaluation of Training Goals," and ask participants to complete it.

Step 3. (5 minutes)
Distribute the "Expectations List" from Phase I and Attachment III-20/1-B, "Discussion Questions."

Step 4. (30 minutes)
Have participants form groups of up to five, and:

* Review and discuss the overall program in relation to the discussion questions.
* List on newsprint 4-5 ways in which their expectations have been met and 4-5 ways in which they have not been met.

Step 5. (5 minutes)
Ask each group to return and post their lists at the front of the room.

Step 6. (40 to 60 minutes)
Option A: Have a representative from each group explain and discuss their list.
Option B: Use the lists as a basis for moving into the "Fishbowl" activity described in Phase I: Session 16, Part Three.

MID-CYCLE AND FINAL EVALUATION OF TRAINING GOALS

Rate the effectiveness of the training program in achieving the following goals. Give 2 or 3 specific examples in support of your rating.

 

Not very Effective

Adequate

Extremely Effective

1. Assess and analyze community felt needs

1

2

3

4

5

2. Assist others in the design, adaptation, construction, utilization and maintenance of simple technologies

1

2

3

4

5

3. Acquire and apply skills and attitudes that promote the improvement of the quality of life through local initiative, community problem solving

1

2

3

4

5

4. Examine and understand the cultural and societal values that accompany all overseas development workers

1

2

3

4

5

5. Develop and practice effective experiential learning and teaching processes

1

2

3

4

5

6. Understand the synergistic relationship between health and technology and the interrelated nature of all aspects of culture

1

2

3

4

5

7. Encourage and include the active, full participation of all community members in programs of change

1

2

3

4

5

8. Maintain personal wellbeing and the attitudes conducive to effective and appropriate overseas service

1

2

3

4

5

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

1. Has the program met expectations?
2. Is the program providing adequate skills training?
3. Is the technical level too high or too low?
4. Could the program be better adapted to suit individual needs?

MID-PROGRAM EVALUATION PART TWO: ASSESSMENT OF GROUP DYNAMICS

Total time:

See Part One

Objective:

To evaluate the dynamics of the group within the context of the training program

Resources:

Attachment III-20/2, "Coat of Arms"

Materials:

List of questions on newsprint (see Step 2)

Procedures:

Step 1. (10 minutes)
Review the session objective and procedures. Distribute Attachment III-20/2, "Coat of Arms."

Trainer Notes

Explain that the object of this exercise is to draw a symbolic "Coat of Arms" which represents perceptions of the dynamics of the group within the context of the training program.

Step 2 . (10 minutes)
Post and explain the list of questions for the coat of arms.

Trainer Notes

Explain that the participants will draw a symbol in the corresponding spaces on the coat of arms that answers the following questions:

1. What has been our major failure as a group?

2. What has been our major accomplishment as a group?

3. To what extent do our interactions here in training reflect the kinds of interactions we will encounter as Peace Corps
Volunteers?

4. What is our major unresolved conflict or problem as a group?

5. What can we do to resolve this conflict or problem?

6. What can we do to improve our interaction skills in general?

Step 3. (20 minutes)
Referring to the posted list, read each question in order, allowing time for people to draw their symbols before moving to the next question.

Trainer Notes

Draw your own coat of arms while the group does theirs.

Step 4. (5 minutes)
After everyone has finished drawing his/her coat of arms, share your coat of arms by explaining the meaning of each of your six drawings.

Step 5. (60 to 60 minutes)
Have each participant explain the meaning of his/her coat of arms.

Trainer Notes

If the group is large (15 or more participants), time limitations may require dividing the group into two or three small groups for this step.

Step 6. (15 minutes)
Conclude the session by having participants summarize the results of the activity, highlighting problems and possible solutions.

Trainer Notes

Time remaining from the scheduled four-hour period can be utilized by moving into the regularly scheduled "Phase Evaluation Questionnaires" or counterpart sessions.


Coat of arms

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