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close this bookNational Guidelines for the Clinical Management of HIV/AIDS - Tanzania (NACP; 2005; 131 pages)
View the documentLIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
View the documentACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
View the documentFOREWORD
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 2: ORGANIZATION OF HIV/AIDS CARE AND TREATMENT
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 3: HIV/AIDS PREVENTION
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 4: PROTECTIVE MEASURES AGAINST HIV TRANSMISSION
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 5: LABORATORY TESTS IN HIV/AIDS
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 6: HIV/AIDS AND PREGNANCY
close this folderCHAPTER 7: PEDIATRIC HIV/AIDS AND RELATED CONDITIONS
View the document7.1 Introduction
View the document7.2 HIV/AIDS Manifestations in Children
View the document7.3 Diagnosis of HIV infection in infants
View the document7.4 Management of infants born to HIV positive women
View the document7.5Care of HIV infected Children
close this folder7.6 Clinical manifestations of paediatric HIV infection
View the document7.6.1 Respiratory conditions in children with HIV infection
View the document7.6.2 Oro-pharyngeal candidiasis in children with HIV infection
View the document7.6.3 Neurologic problems in children with HIV infection
View the document7.6.4 Persistent generalised lymphadenopathy (PGL) in children
View the document7.6.5 Chronic parotitis
View the document7.6.6 Chronic Ear Infection
View the document7.6.7 Persistent or recurrent fever in children
View the document7.6.8 Persistent Diarrhoea
View the document7.6.9 Impaired growth in children with HIV infection
View the document7.6.10 Supportive therapy
View the document7.6.11 Pain control in terminally ill children
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 8: COMMUNITY AND HOME BASED CARE FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS (PLHA)
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 9: COUNSELLING RELATED TO HIV-TESTING AND TREATMENT ADHERENCE
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 10: MANAGEMENT OF COMMON SYMPTOMS AND OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HIV/AIDS
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 11: MANAGEMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS IN HIV/AIDS
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 12: MANAGEMENT OF HIV INFECTED PATIENTS USING ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUGS
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 13: ARV THERAPY IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 14: USE OF ARVS IN SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 15: HIV/AIDS AND NUTRITION
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 16: MANAGEMENT OF ANTIRETROVIRAL MEDICINES
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 17: CERTIFICATION OF HEALTHCARE FACILITIES AS CARE AND TREATMENT SITES
 

7.6.10 Supportive therapy

HIV infected children should be treated like all other children, i.e., they should receive education together with other children of their own age groups, there should be no restrictions placed on their participation in school activities and sports, and they should receive the love and support of family members and teachers.

When ill, children should be treated for their illness and should receive nutritional support and care and counselling when required and should return fully to their school activities as soon as it is possible. Counselling and support should be provided for family members and carers who should be educated on the basic principles of safe practices and preventing infections from occurring through simple measures such as hygienic food preparation and hand washing. Ill children may require physiotherapy that should be provided by experts as well as by family members and carers.

School-age children who are unable to attend school due to illness should receive some form of education at home and should be encouraged to participate in playgroups. Play therapy and educational activities at home provide stimulation for ill children who can learn to live their lives to the fullest despite the illness. All HIV infected children should be assessed regularly and should receive antiretroviral therapy if available.

Family members, clinicians and supporting counsellors should have ongoing discussions on how and when to begin the process of disclosure of status to the HIV-infected child. The delicate balance between providing important information of one’s condition, and the prevalent stigma and discrimination within the community should be maintained.

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