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close this bookNational Guidelines for the Clinical Management of HIV/AIDS - Tanzania (NACP; 2005; 131 pages)
View the documentLIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
View the documentACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
View the documentFOREWORD
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 2: ORGANIZATION OF HIV/AIDS CARE AND TREATMENT
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 3: HIV/AIDS PREVENTION
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 4: PROTECTIVE MEASURES AGAINST HIV TRANSMISSION
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 5: LABORATORY TESTS IN HIV/AIDS
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 6: HIV/AIDS AND PREGNANCY
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 7: PEDIATRIC HIV/AIDS AND RELATED CONDITIONS
close this folderCHAPTER 8: COMMUNITY AND HOME BASED CARE FOR PEOPLE LIVING WITH HIV/AIDS (PLHA)
View the document8.1 Introduction
Open this folder and view contents8.2 Concept of continuum of care and home based care
View the document8.3 Benefits of home based care
View the document8.4 Components of home based care
close this folder8.5 Palliative Care
View the document8.5.1 Symptom management
View the document8.5.2. Terminal care
View the document8.6 Care of body
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 9: COUNSELLING RELATED TO HIV-TESTING AND TREATMENT ADHERENCE
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 10: MANAGEMENT OF COMMON SYMPTOMS AND OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS IN HIV/AIDS
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 11: MANAGEMENT OF MENTAL HEALTH PROBLEMS IN HIV/AIDS
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 12: MANAGEMENT OF HIV INFECTED PATIENTS USING ANTIRETROVIRAL DRUGS
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 13: ARV THERAPY IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 14: USE OF ARVS IN SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 15: HIV/AIDS AND NUTRITION
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 16: MANAGEMENT OF ANTIRETROVIRAL MEDICINES
Open this folder and view contentsCHAPTER 17: CERTIFICATION OF HEALTHCARE FACILITIES AS CARE AND TREATMENT SITES
 

8.5.2. Terminal care

The main aim of those providing terminal care should be to improve the quality of life by removing or alleviating unpleasant symptoms and helping to prevent the patient from suffering, fear or loneliness. This quality care must be provided wherever the patient is, be it at home or in the hospital. Today, because of the home based care approach for HIV/AIDS, many patients are dying at home. This being part of the continuum of care, health care providers are expected to extend their services by training and supporting family members to ensure that terminally ill patients at home are well cared for.

All persons with terminal illnesses need end of life care. Towards the end of life it is essential that the patient and the family have social, emotional and spiritual support. In palliation in terminal illness one attempts to allow the patient to die with dignity and relieve him/her of distressing symptoms. Palliation also offers support to help the patient live as actively as possible until death and enables the family to cope with their loved-one’s illness and with their own bereavement. The carer needs to listen with empathy and should encourage communication within the family. Issues such as family and child support, schooling and welfare should be discussed. The patient should be told that he/she is loved and will be missed by family members. Spiritual support and discussion with the religious leader may relieve feelings of guilt. The carer should be available and should visit regularly. Bereavement counselling should be made available to family members including the children.

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